Latest Shouts In The Shoutbox -- View The Shoutbox · Rules Collapse  


Pages: (3) 1 2 3  ( Go to first unread post )
Add Reply
New Topic
New Poll

 Treasure From Trash
Charles
 Posted: Jan 24 2018, 05:29 PM
Quote


Rana Capillum


Group: Featured Blogers
Posts: 8961
Member No.: 17
Joined: 17-January 12

Status: Offline
Rep: 143 pts






Meet the pioneers in the war on waste, creating treasure from trash


ABC Science
By environment reporter Nick Kilvert


user posted image

Professor Veena Sahajwalla hopes to establish small-scale factories across Australia to turn waste into something useful.
(Supplied: UNSW)

On a single stretch of beach on Cape York Peninsula, volunteers spend four days collecting more than 7 tonnes of rubbish — 1,000 cigarette lighters, 2,280 toothbrushes, 3,320 plastic drink bottles, 5,500 thongs, miles of fishing nets.

The year before, they collected around 3 tonnes. In a year's time, after fresh currents have pushed in from the Coral Sea, a new group of volunteers will come back to find the same stretch of sand blanketed in trash.

Our remote northern beaches bear the symptoms of a global waste pandemic that many will understandably view as an insurmountable curse; efforts to clean it up, well-intentioned but ultimately futile.


user posted image

Turtles often fall victim to rubbish including discarded fishing nets and plastics.
(Alistair Dermer, Ghostnets Australia)

But a beach heaving with our plastic detritus can also look like an opportunity to Professor Veena Sahajwalla.

The very concept of waste, according to Veena, needs to be completely revolutionised.

"We've got to value [waste] as a resource. We really shouldn't have to send any overseas," she says.

"It's an important thing to be prepared to not just see it as a problem but also to see it as a fantastic opportunity."

Veena's team at the University of New South Wales are developing micro-factories: small, modular recycling plants capable of turning a variety of waste into usable materials.

Their micro-factories are capable of turning plastics into filaments: long strands that form the "ink" in 3D printers and can be moulded into anything from car parts and everyday household items, to hardware, tools and medical equipment.

"We're looking at different types of waste plastics, it doesn't have to be the stock-standard PET bottles," Veena says.

"E-waste [such as] printers for example, and things like CDs — all of these we have shown that you can convert them into filaments."

Growing up in Mumbai — one of the world's largest industrial centres, Veena developed a fascination with the things people discard.

"Kids collect stamps, I used to collect rubbish — little glass bottles and little things that to me were like, 'OMG this is so cool!'"

Her micro-factories are also being developed to produce metal alloys from e-waste such as circuit boards, and to reform glass, food packaging and textiles.

"[The system] needs to be flexible enough at the micro-factory level and have different modules to process different types of materials," she says.

The idea, according to Veena, is to enable recycling to happen on a scale that allows rural towns and communities to turn their waste into a valuable commodity.

A community like Lockhart River or Bamaga in Cape York for example, might be able to harvest the tonnes of rubbish that wash up on their beaches and via a 3D printer, convert it into something of use.

Harvesting waste and turning it into something that can be used locally or exported is a disruption to manufacturing, in a similar way Uber is a disruption to transport, or Airbnb to accommodation, according to Veena.

"To me that is the ultimate empowerment — to be locally producing [materials] yourself," she says.

"Let's be exporting the products out to the world … filaments are something that everybody in the world will be using as people do more and more 3D printing."

Her team are launching their micro-factories alongside industry partners later this year.


The 'accidental environmentalist' building a plastic-bottle house

user posted image

Phil's building will eventually contain 100,000 plastic and 400,000 glass bottles.
(Supplied: Phil Smith)

Meanwhile, in Tonga, Phil Smith is coming at the waste issue from an entirely different angle.

Phil's phone keeps dropping out mid-conversation, which he says is all part and parcel of living in Tonga.

"The spinoffs for being a smartarse have been unbelievable. I just can't believe it," he says in between drop-outs.

Running a successful whale-swimming business, Phil who worked for 38 years on a jackhammer in Sydney, was looking for a suitable building material to upgrade his own house and guest accommodation when he stumbled across the idea of building with plastic bottles.

"A couple of photos just struck me — the finishes, how beautiful they were, I thought, 'Well, why not? There's plenty of rubbish around the place, plenty of plastic bottles, plenty of willing helpers'," he says.

Building with bottles involves filling them with a rammed mix of limestone dust and sand — made out of crushed glass — and then setting the bottles within a solid mortar mix.


user posted image

Kids fill bottles for Phil Smith's Tonga bottle house
(Supplied: Scott Portelli, Craig Parry Photography & Phil Smith)

The resulting structure is said to be stronger than an equivalent brick wall, earthquake resistant due to the flex in the plastic, and has the added benefit of removing significant volumes of waste from the environment.

But for Phil, the ecological benefits have paled in comparison to the social outcomes he says have inadvertently sprung out of choosing to build a plastic-bottle house.

"A girl who's a very good environmentalist said to me, 'You're just an accidental environmentalist. You've done more for Tonga than anybody because of your smartarse idea'," he said.

Needing upwards of 100,000 filled plastic bottles for the walls of his building, Phil enlisted the help of local school kids, adding 60 cents per bottle to a fund which he used to buy them laptop computers for their classrooms.

But as he began talking to principals and teachers, he discovered that there were some more basic items than computers that the schools were lacking.

"We think it's funny coming from Australia, but all they wanted was a mower … because it was costing them 150 local dollars every fortnight to get the lawn mowed, and that was the principal's whole budget," Phil says.

"In another school all they wanted was carpet. I couldn't find carpet, so their carpet's lino. Another school lost power to nine of their 12 rooms in cyclone Waka in 2002, so they haven't had power for 15 years. Now they have."


user posted image

The local kids got computers, lino and electricity for their work.
(Supplied: Scott Portelli, Craig Parry Photography & Phil Smith)

Once the kids saw the rewards they were getting for their hard work, Phil says they began clearing the streets and shorelines for rubbish, and entire family groups got involved as well.

"There's one old guy in one group, he's a bit like a horse you'd put in the bottom paddock because he's too old to work on the plantations so he's just sitting at home," he says.

"Now he's filling bottles. When I rock up he smiles, you see both his teeth shining. Even if that just gives him a year or two of that bit of self-worth, well that's fantastic to me."

When Phil dropped the mower off at the school, the principal organised a snap presentation.

"The emotion of these kids, it was six at night, they rang the bell, all the parents and kids came along, they all sat down neatly at the front and then started singing songs," he says.

"The town officers said a couple of prayers. The headmaster, he was crying making a speech just saying that the kids worked hard for this, they got blisters on their hands, they realised that they can work to achieve anything."

Phil's building will eventually have enough space for around 20 guests, a presentation room for workshops, and his own accommodation. He has so far stockpiled 35,000 bottles, and needs another 65,000 to complete the build.

As well as the plastic bottles, he's imported a machine that crushes glass bottles into fine sand that he is using in the mortar mix. He estimates that he'll use around 400,000 glass bottles altogether.

Although he is aiming to make the accommodation as near to 5-star as possible, he says a local custom is giving him some room for pause.

"It looks directly at the King's house. When he's in town he can look down at my place and in Tonga law if the King likes it he can come and take it. So I just hope he doesn't like it too much."


A house of old tyres the future of efficient design

user posted image

Martin Freney wanted to build an earthship that passed Australian building regulations.
(Supplied: Martin Freney)

When Martin Freney came across a bunch of books on earthships in 2007, he says the concept "just made sense".

"I think it was the environmental impacts [of house building] that were a big issue for me," he says.

Earthships are a building design that have struggled to take off in Australia due to strict building regulations.

Pioneered by US architect Michael Reynolds, an earthship incorporates thick insulating walls usually set into a hillside, built from used car tyres filled with rammed earth.

Internal walls are typically built from earth products such as mudbrick and with materials such as glass bottles inlaid. And within these, is a greenhouse where food is grown on recycled grey water, with passive solar and thermal systems providing heat and energy.

In 2011, Martin headed to the US to study the thermal properties of earthships, comparing them to more standard construction methods as part of his PhD research. His findings convinced him that the innovative design is the direction that housing construction needs to take.

Martin set about constructing an earthship at Ironbank in South Australia that could comply with Australia's strict building codes.

He says he had to pick his way through building certifiers until he found one who was willing to do a bit of research.

"There are different ways of achieving compliance," Martin says.

"[We found] a private certifier that had the knowledge and resources and was interested in the idea [enough] to look into the national construction code."

Once he found the right certifier, he says getting the building to comply was relatively straight forward, but he ran into trouble with his grey water system.


user posted image

Inside Martin Freney's Ironbank earthship
(Supplied: Martin Freney)

Although Martin initially had the system pumping into the greenhouse, council ordered it to be removed over health and odour concerns.

"I was foolish enough to brag about it in a newspaper," he says.

Despite the compromise, Martin says his resulting earthship, which is now run as a bed and breakfast, has remained true to the principals of sustainable design.

"People are coming and enjoying it and experiencing it and, overwhelmingly, they want one, or they don't want to leave."


http://www.abc.net.au/news/science/2018-01-24/meet-the-pioneers-in-the-war-on-waste/9329038

These people are the real "progressives" of this world.

--------------------
"A lie gets halfway around the world before the truth has a chance to get its pants on." - Winston Churchill
PMEmail
^
Bear
 Posted: Jan 28 2018, 08:32 AM
Quote


Diamond


Group: Active Member
Posts: 2241
Member No.: 79
Joined: 7-August 13

Status: Offline
Rep: 8 pts






On a single stretch of beach on Cape York Peninsula, volunteers spend four days collecting more than 7 tonnes of rubbish...........The year before, they collected around 3 tonnes. In a year's time, after fresh currents have pushed in from the Coral Sea, a new group of volunteers will come back to find the same stretch of sand blanketed in trash.

I agree Charles, it doesn't appear that they will get on top of this task in our lifetimes - to think that taxpayer's money is wasted on 'progressive activists' who do no more than cause trouble is annoying to those who have worked all their lives.

If they love this country as much as they seem to indicate why don't they get involved instead of being no more than a menace to our society.

I have been involved with Clean Up Australia Day, the amount of rubbish collected is disgraceful.




--------------------
Politicians and diapers should be changed frequently and all for the same reason.

~José Maria de Eça de Queiroz,

We live in a world in which politics has replaced philosophy. ~Martin L. Gross, A Call for Revolution, 1993

"Stupid people are like glow sticks: I wanna snap em and shake the shit outta them till the light comes on."
PM
^
Bill
 Posted: Jan 28 2018, 02:14 PM
Quote


Gold


Group: Active Member
Posts: 2838
Member No.: 85
Joined: 17-December 13

Status: Offline
Rep: 8 pts






These people are the real "progressives" of this world.

to think that taxpayer's money is wasted on 'progressive activists' who do no more than cause trouble is annoying to those who have worked all their lives.


Sooo....can I take it that you two now understand that there's more to being a progressive than you first thought.......or are you still of the opinion that there are 'good progressives' and 'bad progressives', depending on whether they support your blinkered view of the world. http://fairdinkumnewschat.com/biggrin.gif http://fairdinkumnewschat.b1.jcink.com/uploads/fairdinkumnewschat/lbill.gif

I have been involved with Clean Up Australia Day, the amount of rubbish collected is disgraceful.

....and who do you think have been out there helping you to "Clean Up Australia" Bear ?? It's certainly not the far right wing fundamentalists. http://fairdinkumnewschat.b1.jcink.com/uploads/fairdinkumnewschat/Smiley_winknod.gif

--------------------
It's a tough gig being the only duck in the shooting gallery
PM
^
lee
 Posted: Jan 28 2018, 02:34 PM
Quote


Rana Capillum


Group: Active Member
Posts: 7270
Member No.: 48
Joined: 15-February 12

Status: Offline
Rep: 17 pts






QUOTE
..and who do you think have been out there helping you to "Clean Up Australia" Bear ?? It's certainly not the far right wing fundamentalists.


Got a reference for that?

--------------------
Life is neither a race to the end, nor a slow ramble whose sole aim is longevity

Do not regret growing older. It is a privilege denied to many.
PM
^
Charles
 Posted: Jan 28 2018, 02:34 PM
Quote


Rana Capillum


Group: Featured Blogers
Posts: 8961
Member No.: 17
Joined: 17-January 12

Status: Offline
Rep: 143 pts






Bill, I have no issue with the true political progressives who favour and work towards social reform. However, there is a group of left wing agitators calling themselves progressive while they have an agenda that has little to do with social reform and everything to do with anti democratic behaviour.

They frequently refuse to accept democratic decisions unless it suits them. They are unprepared to enter rational debate, preferring to label those they disagree with as "Facists", "Nazis", "Right-Wing Rednecks" etc. I freely acknowledge that there are extremists in both sides of politics and the extreme right may deserve some of those tags. However, I find it frustrating that members of the extreme left call themselves "Progressive" when their actions and words are quite "Regressive".

As a teacher I was regarded as progressive by my peers. I was offered and accepted the position of Principal of an Alternative School because of my progressive views *. In other fields such as sporting coaching and administration I was often described as progressive. It is a tag that should be earned and worn with pride.

What sort of progressive are you Bill? One who favours reform and advancement of a community as a whole, or a left wing agitator who sidesteps rational debate and applies labels to those who disagree with you?


http://fairdinkumnewschat.b1.jcink.com/uploads/fairdinkumnewschat/lbill.gif

* I should explain that I returned to the mainstream system after a year because I wasn't prepared to abandon the standards, both academic and social, that I held. Sadly, some of the parents at the Alternative School were too alternative.

This post has been edited by Charles: Jan 28 2018, 02:53 PM

--------------------
"A lie gets halfway around the world before the truth has a chance to get its pants on." - Winston Churchill
PMEmail
^
Bill
 Posted: Jan 28 2018, 05:11 PM
Quote


Gold


Group: Active Member
Posts: 2838
Member No.: 85
Joined: 17-December 13

Status: Offline
Rep: 8 pts






What sort of progressive are you Bill? One who favours reform and advancement of a community as a whole, or a left wing agitator who sidesteps rational debate and applies labels to those who disagree with you?

That's probably for others to decide Charles, because it is of no importance to me. You seem to be saying that only progressives who you agree with are OK Charles. http://fairdinkumnewschat.com/biggrin.gif

My 'progressiveness' has been formed over many years of life experience, being raised in a family that was torn apart by my father's experience in WW2 and my parents growing up poor during the Great Depression. BTW, I don't have anything but love and respect for my parents, and I know that they loved me and my brother. They did the best the could under the circumstances that prevailed at the time.

I was raised by a single working Mum, and I raised my son as a single working Dad, so most of my life has been a financial struggle.

My political background was formed by my involvement in the union movement in the 60's and political involvement with the Australia Party through to 1975.

Went on strike once for 24 hours when John Howard shut down Medibank. http://fairdinkumnewschat.b1.jcink.com/uploads/fairdinkumnewschat/Smiley_winknod.gif

I was mixed up with CANE (Campaign Against Nuclear Energy) in the 1960's, specifically the campaign against atmospheric testing on Mururoa Atoll , and the siting of an Omega Tracking Station in the Bunya Mountains.

In those days it was easy to get a QLD Special Branch file, An AFP file, and an ASIO file if you were involved in any sort of political activism, and I managed the trifecta. Not sure where that stands now .

Some of the 'Special Branch' files were shredded when Joh was ousted, and some went to Canberra. I was in good company with the Special Branch File, along with three Labor Premiers. http://fairdinkumnewschat.com/biggrin.gif

I was against the American War in Vietnam, but not the troops. My brother and many of my mates served there and had their lives destroyed. In the 90's I volunteered with the VVCS to support my brother and three or four of his friends.

I did my primary schooling in Central QLD where about a quarter of the school was indigenous and my mates were those kids. The closest female friend that I have (almost 50 years) was one of the stolen generation, I saw first hand the racism directed at her.

Generally speaking, I look at social issues from the perspective that, if it doesn't affect me personally, my opinion is largely irrelevant. Societies are always changing to reflect the views of individuals in that society. Some things we may agree with and some we may not, but our view is just one view, and the people with a dog in the fight should be listene4d to.

As I get older, I find it frustrating that we, as a society are less empathetic that I would like - and that's disappointing. It seems like a huge waste of time to expend energy on defending issues that don't affect anything other than our sensibilities.

I get a bit cranky when people on FDNC use the term 'progressives' as a form of insult, that can only be directed at me, since I am the only 'progressive' on the site, but I don't lose any sleep over it. http://fairdinkumnewschat.com/biggrin.gif

My politics was always going to be Labor leaning as my grandfather, William Friis stood for Labor in the seat of Murrumba in the QLD election in 1926.

--------------------
It's a tough gig being the only duck in the shooting gallery
PM
^
Charles
 Posted: Jan 28 2018, 05:34 PM
Quote


Rana Capillum


Group: Featured Blogers
Posts: 8961
Member No.: 17
Joined: 17-January 12

Status: Offline
Rep: 143 pts






"You seem to be saying that only progressives who you agree with are OK Charles."

Not so Bill. There are true progressives with whom I disagree on a number of issues but I respect their views and ability to express rational opinions. You may find it hard to believe but I actually agree with some of your comments regarding international politics.

What I object to is the hijacking of the term progressive by an extreme group who lay claim to the tag and, at the same time, add offensive tags to those with whom they disagree.

When I asked you what sort of progressive you were, it was a tongue in cheek question though you have shown traits of both types at times. Especially when you start using the "Facist" and "Nazi" labels to describe those with right wing political leanings.

I thank you for providing such a detailed description of your life and background. Such things can definitely colour one's political and social beliefs.

When I use the term "progressive" in a negative context, it isn't intended as a personal insult nor is it aimed specifically at you.

--------------------
"A lie gets halfway around the world before the truth has a chance to get its pants on." - Winston Churchill
PMEmail
^
scepo
 Posted: Jan 29 2018, 07:00 AM
Quote


Supremo Poster


Group: Moderators
Posts: 16388
Member No.: 3
Joined: 21-July 11

Status: Offline
Rep: 65 pts






QUOTE
I get a bit cranky when people on FDNC use the term 'progressives' as a form of insult, that can only be directed at me, since I am the only 'progressive' on the site, but I don't lose any sleep over it.



Speaking for myself Bill, my criticism of "progressives" is not aimed at you personally.

Generally speaking in this day and age self proclaimed progressives come across as a bunch of tossers who have a huge superiority complex and consider anyone with a slightly conservative outlook to be dinosaurs, rednecks, alt right, far right, homophobes, racists, bigots and fascists etc etc etc. There seems to be a never ending list of labels that they wilfully stick onto anyone who dares to disagree with their "progressive" outlook.

We all know that there are some far right bogans out there who are nothing but trouble makers and deserved to be locked up. I have never supported them and never would.

But I think it obvious to anyone and everyone that there are far more left wing "progressive" activist nutters/anarchists out there who scream and howl, destroy property, incite violence to get their views heard. Those are the ones I condemn.

--------------------
Everybody is Willing:
Some are willing to work, the rest are willing to let them!

The older I get, the better I was.
PM
^
Flin
 Posted: Jan 29 2018, 08:07 AM
Quote


Supremo Poster


Group: Admin
Posts: 12950
Member No.: 1
Joined: 20-July 11

Status: Offline
Rep: 47 pts






I have never considered that Bill was a "Progressive",
Actually I think our friend Bill has a combination of progressive and traditionalist values which makes him unique and an asset to the site.
Because he says what he thinks., that makes him fair dinkum. ie. (no hidden agendas,) which doesn't fit in with my view of what is a "Progressive."
Many people who are labelled Progressive, are nothing but mindless rabid leftie jerks.
Just like the word "Gay", "Progressive" it is a misnomer when used to label many people.
http://fairdinkumnewschat.com/wink.gif http://fairdinkumnewschat.b1.jcink.com/uploads/fairdinkumnewschat/smiley_IMHO.png\

noun
noun: progressive; plural noun: progressives; noun: progressive proof; plural noun: progressive proofs
1.
an advocate of social reform.
"people tend to present themselves either as progressives or traditionalists on this issue"

--------------------
Living In An Elected Dictatorship
Flin's opinions and comments reflect his perception of the facts and not necessarily reality
PMEmailWebsite
^
Alicia
 Posted: Jan 29 2018, 08:53 AM
Quote


Silver


Group: Active Member
Posts: 1606
Member No.: 53
Joined: 13-March 12

Status: Offline
Rep: 10 pts






Bill, I think there is a fair bit of “ the devil’s advocate” in your posts. You ask questions to make us all think about things from a different point of view. I don’t know how much “ conversion” goes on, but a different outlook and point of view can only be a good thing for all contributors, http://fairdinkumnewschat.b1.jcink.com/uploads/fairdinkumnewschat/smiley_IMHO.png of course. https://s20.postimg.cc/x68t0lwf1/1120275_KASPa_Hdl.gif http://fairdinkumnewschat.b1.jcink.com/uploads/fairdinkumnewschat/lbill.gif http://fairdinkumnewschat.com/rolleyes.gif http://fairdinkumnewschat.com/wink.gif
PMEmail
^
1 User(s) are reading this topic (1 Guests and 0 Anonymous Users)
0 Members:
Share this topic:
« Next Oldest | Environmental Issues | Next Newest »

Topic Options
Pages: (3) 1 2 3 
Add Reply
New Topic
New Poll