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Posted by: Charles Jun 30 2018, 01:33 PM
Outcry over word 'Aboriginal' continues as historians push for ban on changing certificates

By Rebecca Turner

user posted image

Photo: Mr Smith noticed the word 'Aboriginal' had been removed from his great-grandmother's death certificate. (ABC News: Hugh Sando)

The decision by a West Australian bureaucrat to redact the word "Aboriginal" from official documents has created an outcry among archivists, genealogists and historians across Australia.

WA is the only jurisdiction in Australia to deem the word Aboriginal offensive and remove it from historical birth, death and marriage certificates.

The practice only came to light last month after keen family historian Garry Smith told the ABC about the word Aboriginal being whited out from his great-grandmother's death certificate.

He was told by the WA Registry of Births, Deaths and Marriages the word had been redacted because it was an offensive term.


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Photo: Garry Smith uncovered the practice while studying documents of his family history. (ABC News: Hugh Sando)

The incident has shocked archivists, genealogists and historians, who were unaware the registrar had the power to remove offensive material, let alone was exercising it.

It has also revealed a sharp divide between how the WA Government sees records of life events — as official identity documents they are charged to manage — and the views of researchers, including the growing number of amateur family historians, who see them as important historical documents.

Political correctness concern

Australian Society of Archivists president Julia Mant said removing the term Aboriginal was a "sledgehammer" approach to a sensitive issue.

WA Genealogical Society head Ian Simon said he was worried that historical documents had been changed "to fit the niceties or political correctness of the day".

They are among those supporting a campaign driven by the History Council of WA for the WA registrar of births deaths and marriages to be stripped of his powers to remove information which he decides is offensive.

"It is a matter of grave concern that the WA Act permits the registrar to make changes to a certificate if, in their opinion, a word is 'offensive'," History Council president Jenny Gregory wrote to WA Attorney-General John Quigley.

"Such a decision is simply a 'matter of opinion'. The main concern of our members and historians across Australia is the redaction of information relating to Aboriginality."

Under WA's laws, the registrar can remove a word or expression from certificates if it "is, or may be regarded as, offensive".


user posted image

Photo: Mr Smith points to the original birth certificate using the label Aboriginal (left) and the redacted version (right). (ABC News: Rebecca Turner)

NT doesn't deem 'Aboriginal' offensive

Northern Territory registrar-general Jim Laouris is the only other Australian bureaucrat to have this power, but has chosen only to remove the term "half-caste".

"The word 'Aboriginal' was not deemed to be offensive and is still included on certificates," he said in a written statement.

WA registrar Brett Burns said many of the details included on old certificates such as "illegitimate" or "half-caste" were personal observations which may have had no basis in fact.

"Current legislation allows the registrar to remove reference to terms that may be offensive (or hurtful)," he said.

"That is why, and for no other reason, that birth certificates that reference Aboriginality [have the term] removed."

His manager, Department of Justice director-general Adam Tomison, said there was no place for terms based on "someone's interpretation at the time".

"The word Aboriginal, there's nothing offensive about that," Dr Tomison said.

"But in the context of perhaps, if you're a family of Indian extraction and someone has decided that your great-grandmother was Aboriginal, mistakenly, that may be an issue that causes them some distress."

Registrar's call backed by government

But Mr Smith said the observation that his great-grandmother was Aboriginal was factual, and she was a well-known elder at the Carrolup Mission, near Katanning.

"You'd have pretty poor eyesight if you didn't know what a full-blood Aboriginal looked like," he said.

"My great-grandmother was the last full-blood Aboriginal of her kind down there."

The registrar's decision has been supported by WA Aboriginal Affairs Minister Ben Wyatt.


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Photo: Mr Wyatt says removing the word 'Aboriginal' was not intended to cause offence. (ABC News: James Carmody)

"I don't think — and I've inquired about this — it wasn't intended to be particularly offensive to Aboriginal people or the term Aboriginality," he said.

"It was simply trying to correct something which developed years ago and remove that annotation."

Reality of history 'not for the faint-hearted'

Ms Mant said she and other record-keepers had a difficult job in balancing their duties to manage official documents but also sensitively handle material which could offend people.

But she thought the decision to redact all non-standard information from certificates was "weird" and a "sledgehammer" approach that should be reviewed.

"It's like they made a decision to take it out without realising that people are accessing their family records for family history and identification purposes," she said.

"It's definitely short-sighted."

Ms Mant said it was important to consult with people about potentially offensive material.


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Photo: The WA Genealogical Society's president Ian Simon said people often made shock discoveries while researching their family history. (ABC News: Hugh Sando)

That sentiment was shared by Mr Simon, who said family history was not for the faint-hearted. Many people made shock discoveries of bigamy, illegitimacy, and manipulated birth dates in their research.

"People can be offended by terms that were used in the 1800s," he said.

"It was common to refer to someone as an 'idiot'. There was 'idiocy' and 'lunacy' — one refers to mental illness and one refers to developmental problems."

But he did not support removing this material from documents, and said it provided important historical clues for researchers.

Dr Tomison said he would consider giving the public more information about the redactions when they were buying extracts, but said the certificates were primarily a legal document.

"That's the first purpose and that's what the registrar is set up to do — record people's births, their deaths and their marriages," he said.

"I think on that basis their focus is going to be on recording the basic facts. They're not really set up as a genealogical society or anything like that."


http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-06-30/outcry-over-removal-of-word-aboriginal-from-certificates/9920794

The dictionary defines aboriginal as:
"adjective
inhabiting or existing in a land from the earliest times or from before the arrival of colonists; indigenous."


What is offensive about that? The word is no more offensive than the alternative "indigenous". Both are titles that should be worn with pride.

Sadly the PC brigade are at it again - telling us what is and isn't offensive and trying to change history.

Posted by: charka Jun 30 2018, 01:49 PM
It is an expensive one 30 billion worth Good take it away and they are not one Same as us To much time on peoples hands

Posted by: Alicia Jun 30 2018, 04:08 PM
This sort of stuff is based on current pc fad ideas of our society. If the current policy is to leave out the word or designation “ aboriginal”, fine, don’t use the word in current times. Changing documents to fit with current ideals is wrong, as it changes the history contained in the document in it’s original form, that is interfering with the historical records, and in my opinion, that is not on. There is too much changing” history” to match current pc etc stuff. Once the changes are on Google/internet,they then become true and factual. Try and tell one of the younger generation how things were and they will argue black and blue that you are wrong, because “I read”,”Fred said”,”Google said”,”the teacher said” that that is not correct. Doesn’t matter that you were “there”, you are wrong. http://fairdinkumnewschat.b1.jcink.com/uploads/fairdinkumnewschat/soapbox_888.gif

Posted by: Bill Jul 2 2018, 04:55 PM
Quote from Charles:
The dictionary defines aboriginal as:
"adjective
inhabiting or existing in a land from the earliest times or from before the arrival of colonists; indigenous."

What is offensive about that? The word is no more offensive than the alternative "indigenous". Both are titles that should be worn with pride.

Sadly the PC brigade are at it again - telling us what is and isn't offensive and trying to change history


=====================================================

You may have inadvertently answered your own question Charles.

The use of the word 'aboriginal' as a NOUN is what most, (not all), Aboriginal People find offensive.

E'G. If you referred to my friend as an "Aboriginal" she would remove your head from your shoulders, such is her anger at the use of the term. If you referred to her as an "Aboriginal Woman", she would wear that with pride, and regard your comment as a mark of your respect for her..

It is Garry Smith's right to question the redaction of his great grandmother's death certificate, but as Dr Tomison pointed out. The issue is more complex than just a case of Political Correctness.

Dr Tomison said he would consider giving the public more information about the redactions when they were buying extracts, but said the certificates were primarily a legal document.

"That's the first purpose and that's what the registrar is set up to do — record people's births, their deaths and their marriages," he said.

"I think on that basis their focus is going to be on recording the basic facts. They're not really set up as a genealogical society or anything like that."


It comes as no surprise that some people would see the redactions as some sort of PC Brigade conspiracy as that suits their purpose.

My view is that the records should remain as recorded, as it demonstrates a truth about our colonial past, but where family members request copies of certificates, they should be made aware of the redactions that have taken place. It should then be the family members decision to include the redactions - or not.

Here's an exercise for everyone. Every time you hear the term 'Aboriginal', ask yourself if the word is used as an adjective or a noun......and the adjective is never a 'plural'. (Aboriginals) http://fairdinkumnewschat.b1.jcink.com/uploads/fairdinkumnewschat/lbill.gif

Posted by: Phillip J. Jul 2 2018, 05:42 PM
"A storm in a teacup" would be good description for this subject. I don't get Bill's friend wanting take a person's head off if she was referred to as "Aboriginal!" Well, with respect, what else could she be? Being that she is female, is there any reason to call her an "Aboriginal Woman?" I would think that the word "woman" is a given, being that she is, in fact, a woman. I mean, that would be like describing my wife as a "white woman!" Totally unnecessary, considering.....! http://fairdinkumnewschat.b1.jcink.com/uploads/fairdinkumnewschat/smiley_don_t_know.gif

Posted by: Flin Jul 2 2018, 06:12 PM
Strange that native Canadians have gone through the full gamut.
First, Savages. then Indians then Indigenous, then
First Nation and now it is political correct to call them Aborigines.

Go figure.
''/

Posted by: Alicia Jul 2 2018, 06:13 PM
We are now being encouraged to not designate people as woman or man, how will that work? There are decisions to be made as to which group has prior claim on which words. http://fairdinkumnewschat.com/rolleyes.gif How are you going to describe your friend Bill?

Posted by: charka Jul 2 2018, 07:31 PM
certainly thin skinned. What about what us whites are called funny no probs accepting money off white people Bet center link is not offensive

Posted by: Michael.W Jul 2 2018, 08:36 PM
I guess there ancestors of their heritage who stood to defend this land on more than one historical occasions including when the 1st fleets arrived got it wrong...

What a sad state of affairs all stirred up by a total incomprehensible action after the fact.

Some people should learn their history before making pathetic media accusations of trying the belittle the general people of our country

Posted by: scepo Jul 3 2018, 06:37 AM
No excuses can change the fact that it is PC overboard yet again. http://fairdinkumnewschat.b1.jcink.com/uploads/fairdinkumnewschat/smiley_IMHO.png

Posted by: charka Jul 3 2018, 07:30 AM
Who exactly is upset be hard to put a name to them? Should be more upset about child rape and curable diseases allowed to run rampant

Posted by: Phillip J. Jul 3 2018, 03:31 PM
To me, there are only two genders. Male and Female. There is no third sex! Unless you count hermaphrodites. That's about it, really! http://fairdinkumnewschat.b1.jcink.com/uploads/fairdinkumnewschat/smiley_don_t_know.gif

Posted by: Bear Jul 3 2018, 07:09 PM
"E'G. If you referred to my friend as an "Aboriginal" she would remove your head from your shoulders, such is her anger at the use of the term."

Well, that says a lot Bill - and you of all people are very quick to label members as 'Neo-Nazis' and 'White Supremacists' if they say anything that you deem is against your way of thinking, and to my knowledge, no one here has ever made a gesture like you have.

When the shoe is on the other foot it is Ok to 'remove your head from your shoulders' trash Western culture and scream abuse like a SJW.

Bill's comment reminds me of those who had signs demanding the beheadings of those who they claimed had insulted their prophet.


"To me, there are only two genders. Male and Female."

Don't get Bill started on that Phillip http://fairdinkumnewschat.com/wink.gif we now have an alphabet of 'genders'. http://fairdinkumnewschat.com/rolleyes.gif



Posted by: Charles Jul 5 2018, 09:33 AM
QUOTE (Bill @ Jul 2 2018, 04:55 PM)
Quote from Charles:
The dictionary defines aboriginal as:
"adjective
inhabiting or existing in a land from the earliest times or from before the arrival of colonists; indigenous."

What is offensive about that? The word is no more offensive than the alternative "indigenous". Both are titles that should be worn with pride.

Sadly the PC brigade are at it again - telling us what is and isn't offensive and trying to change history


=====================================================

You may have inadvertently answered your own question Charles.

The use of the word 'aboriginal' as a NOUN is what most, (not all), Aboriginal People find offensive.

E'G. If you referred to my friend as an  "Aboriginal" she would remove your head from your shoulders, such is her anger at the use of the term. If you referred to her as an "Aboriginal Woman", she would wear that with pride, and regard your comment as a mark of your respect for her..

It is Garry Smith's right to question the redaction of his great grandmother's death certificate, but as Dr Tomison pointed out. The issue is more complex than just a case of Political Correctness.

Dr Tomison said he would consider giving the public more information about the redactions when they were buying extracts, but said the certificates were primarily a legal document.

"That's the first purpose and that's what the registrar is set up to do — record people's births, their deaths and their marriages," he said.

"I think on that basis their focus is going to be on recording the basic facts. They're not really set up as a genealogical society or anything like that."


It comes as no surprise that some people would see  the redactions as some sort of PC Brigade conspiracy as that suits their purpose.

My view is that the records should remain as recorded, as it demonstrates a truth about our colonial past, but where family members request copies of certificates, they should be made aware of the redactions that have taken place. It should then be the family members decision to include the redactions  - or not.

Here's an exercise for everyone. Every time you hear the term 'Aboriginal', ask yourself if the word is used as an adjective or a noun......and the adjective is never a 'plural'. (Aboriginals)  http://fairdinkumnewschat.b1.jcink.com/uploads/fairdinkumnewschat/lbill.gif


There is no need for you to lecture on the use of adjectives as nouns Bill. It is a practice that has been used for decades.

The correct noun for a person of Aboriginal birth is Aborigine but, just as it has become acceptable to use adjectives such as Australian, American etc as a noun, so has the use of the adjective "Aboriginal" as a noun.

Would you object to being called an Australian, or do you require the addition of a noun (eg Australian male) for the word to become acceptable?

On the birth certificate the word "Aboriginal" was used as an adjective and it shouldn't be a word to be ashamed of or angry about.. On other forms, adjectives such as Chinese, Spanish, English might be used in the same manner.

In another post you wrote "Language, like social norms, change over time according to the wishes of contemporary society" yet here you are, criticising changes to the use of words that were originally designed as adjectives.




Posted by: charka Jul 5 2018, 04:53 PM
The offend police at work centre link is not offensive though

Posted by: Bill Jul 5 2018, 07:14 PM
From my previous post:

The use of the word 'aboriginal' as a NOUN is what most, (not all), Aboriginal People find offensive

What part of that don't you guys understand ? http://fairdinkumnewschat.com/biggrin.gif

The use of the word as a noun was used as a form of abuse and vilification - ask anyone from the 'stolen generation' - generally shortened to 'abos'.

BTW the comment "If you referred to my friend as an "Aboriginal" she would remove your head from your shoulders, such is her anger at the use of the term" was rhetorical - as if you didn't know. I used it to demonstrate the depth of the anger felt by my friend. Some need to take it literally to justify why they should be the arbiters of what an aboriginal person finds offensive.


What gives you the right to decide whether my friend should find the term offensive or not - Oh I get it - You're white and you're entitled. http://fairdinkumnewschat.com/biggrin.gif http://fairdinkumnewschat.b1.jcink.com/uploads/fairdinkumnewschat/lbill.gif I forgot - my mistake. http://fairdinkumnewschat.com/biggrin.gif

Posted by: Bear Jul 5 2018, 07:33 PM
"What gives you the right to decide whether my friend should find the term offensive or not - Oh I get it - You're white and you're entitled."

Here we go again http://fairdinkumnewschat.com/rolleyes.gif - now that sounds like an ABC kid's program Bill where they describe white men teleporting to Australia, I am sure Captain Cook would have preferred this means of transport, I hope that parents explain the truth. http://fairdinkumnewschat.com/rolleyes.gif

Bill, my wife has several members from the 'stolen generation' they would be offended with the term Abo, as to be expected. I have never heard them make anything of the words 'Aboriginal' or 'Aborigine'.

Maybe I should change my avatar to a polar bear.
http://fairdinkumnewschat.com/rolleyes.gif

Posted by: charka Jul 5 2018, 08:40 PM
Would not the aboriginal have a racist view

Posted by: scepo Jul 5 2018, 09:40 PM
Well Bill should I feel offended for being called a white c**t to my face? http://fairdinkumnewschat.b1.jcink.com/uploads/fairdinkumnewschat/smiley_don_t_know.gif

I shrugged it off and moved on.

Silly me perhaps. http://fairdinkumnewschat.com/rolleyes.gif

Posted by: Bill Jul 6 2018, 12:44 AM
QUOTE (scepo @ Jul 5 2018, 09:40 PM)
Well Bill should I feel offended for being called a white c**t to my face?  http://fairdinkumnewschat.b1.jcink.com/uploads/fairdinkumnewschat/smiley_don_t_know.gif
I shrugged it off and moved on.
Silly me perhaps.  http://fairdinkumnewschat.com/rolleyes.gif


It depends sceoo - do you identify as being a white c**t http://fairdinkumnewschat.com/biggrin.gif http://fairdinkumnewschat.b1.jcink.com/uploads/fairdinkumnewschat/lbill.gif ?

I would certainly be offended if I was referred to in that way. No offence btw. scepo. http://fairdinkumnewschat.b1.jcink.com/uploads/fairdinkumnewschat/lbill.gif - but more for the last word than the first. http://fairdinkumnewschat.com/biggrin.gif

Just as you and I can decide whether a reference is offensive to us, my friend has that same right - in her case it's based on many years of bad experiences.

Posted by: scepo Jul 6 2018, 06:00 AM
I identify as a reasonably normal human being Bill. I should say male human being as I am not confused about my gender. http://fairdinkumnewschat.com/biggrin.gif

I see no point in taking offence. The more people abuse me, the dumber I know they are. http://fairdinkumnewschat.b1.jcink.com/uploads/fairdinkumnewschat/smiley_don_t_know.gif

Posted by: Charles Jul 6 2018, 09:35 AM
Hi Bill,

As the questions I have posed to you in previous posts tend to be ignored, would you at least answer this one.

Would your friend object to being called an Aborigine?

The reason I ask is that Aboriginal was an adjective used to describe an Aborigine (noun). You indicate she wouldn't be offended by the use of Aboriginal as an adjective, citing "Aboriginal woman" as a more than acceptable descriptor. Can I draw the conclusion that "Female Aborigine" would be equally acceptable and, if so, why is it necessary to include gender?

Your final comment, "You're white and you're entitled". is the lowest form of sarcasm and contributes nothing to this debate.

Posted by: Alicia Jul 6 2018, 11:07 AM
In your opinion, was the bureaucrat in the WA Registry of Births, Deaths and Marriages correct to decide that the word aboriginal was offensive and should be removed from records?

Posted by: Bill Jul 6 2018, 03:02 PM
QUOTE (Charles @ Jul 6 2018, 09:35 AM)
Hi Bill,

As the questions I have posed to you in previous posts tend to be ignored, would you at least answer this one.

Would your friend object to being called an Aborigine?

The reason I ask is that Aboriginal was an adjective used to describe an Aborigine (noun). You indicate she wouldn't be offended by the use of Aboriginal as an adjective, citing "Aboriginal woman" as a more than acceptable descriptor. Can I draw the conclusion that "Female Aborigine" would be equally acceptable and, if so, why is it necessary to include gender?

Your final comment, "You're white and you're entitled". is the lowest form of sarcasm and contributes nothing to this debate.

Hi Charles
To answer your first question. No, she wouldn't object to being called an Aborigine.

Her objection is to the use of the word Aboriginal as a NOUN as it brings back memories of the abuse associated with its use. Try to think 'stolen generation', living in camps on the outskirts of towns, and Cunnamulla, in the 1950s Charles.

Your final comment, "You're white and you're entitled". is the lowest form of sarcasm and contributes nothing to this debate.

It's accurate though Charles. As I pointed out earlier, what is it about this issue that gives YOU the right to decide what is offensive to an aboriginal person ?

Posted by: Flin Jul 6 2018, 03:07 PM
I used the word "Abbo" for most of my life and never knew it was offensive until Banjo Bob pointed it out http://fairdinkumnewschat.b1.jcink.com/uploads/fairdinkumnewschat/smiley_don_t_know.gif

Posted by: Bill Jul 6 2018, 03:20 PM
QUOTE (Alicia @ Jul 6 2018, 11:07 AM)
In your opinion, was the bureaucrat in the WA Registry of Births, Deaths and Marriages correct to decide that the word aboriginal was offensive and should be removed from records?

Hi Alicia
I assume that your comment was addressed to me. I apologise if it was intended for someone else.

The bureaucrat was probably responding to something completely different, and as he pointed out, there were cases of some people of Indian descent who were incorrectly described as 'aboriginal'. It may very well be that the bureaucrat was not at all concerned at Aboriginal people being described as 'aboriginal, but that others may be - interesting proposition in itself.

From the article, I'm not even sure that Garry Smith, who was the subject of the original ABC program was offended by the description, just upset at its removal. Garry is heavily involved in Sovereign Union, and organization promoting 'First Nations' peoples rights around the world, so his interest is more likely historical than anything else.

I think that they have arrived at the right outcome though. It's a legal document of 'births, deaths' etc., and the ethnicity is irrelevant, but that information that was removed is made available to those applying for records as a historical document would be given access to the full document.

A win/win fro everybody IMO. http://fairdinkumnewschat.b1.jcink.com/uploads/fairdinkumnewschat/lbill.gif

Posted by: Bill Jul 6 2018, 03:25 PM
QUOTE (Flin @ Jul 6 2018, 03:07 PM)
I used the word "Abbo" for most of my life and never knew it was offensive until Banjo Bob pointed it out   http://fairdinkumnewschat.b1.jcink.com/uploads/fairdinkumnewschat/smiley_don_t_know.gif

It has a lot to do with the context of how it was used Flin, and was never intended as a term of endearment or acceptance It belongs in the 1950s.

Banjo was a smart man, except for his support for the Sea Eagles http://fairdinkumnewschat.com/biggrin.gif . I miss our conversations. http://fairdinkumnewschat.b1.jcink.com/uploads/fairdinkumnewschat/lbill.gif

Posted by: Charles Jul 6 2018, 03:49 PM
'Your final comment, "You're white and you're entitled". is the lowest form of sarcasm and contributes nothing to this debate.

It's accurate though Charles. As I pointed out earlier, what is it about this issue that gives YOU the right to decide what is offensive to an aboriginal person ?'

I don't claim the right to decide what is or isn't offensive to an Aboriginal person. That is your very inaccurate assumption.

I was simply trying to establish what is offensive and why. Your posts have answered that in part and for that I thank you.

As a bit of background information for you, I have had considerable contact with Aboriginal people - both growing up and as an adult.

Soon after arriving in Australia we moved into a suburb where a Pallottine mission was in close proximity. I have fond memories of playing basketball with and against the Aboriginal boys there.

Later, as a young man, I played local football. The first coach of the newly established team was a respected Aboriginal football who had played at a higher level. The team included many young men from the mission. I have since attended reunions with the Club and have always enjoyed the companionship of former teammates.

As a graduating teacher I was appointed to a country town in the South West. Sadly it was the only team in the competition without any Aboriginal players competing. I have a strong memory of a Club meeting at which players were asked if they objected to any of "the boys from the reserve" playing. When asked to raise a hand to allow such a move mine was just one of three hands raised. The other two belonged to other newcomers to the town.

Having taught in a number of schools with Aboriginal students I grew to understand much of their culture. It was through this knowledge I believe I was able to develop a good rapport with them.

Using "Aboriginal" as a noun being offensive is something of which I was unaware. I have never have had that expressed to me by any of my Nyoongar friends or students.

I have certainly heard of Politically Correct white "Progressives" deciding for others what is and isn't offensive - be it to Aboriginal people or other ethnic groups. That in itself I find offensive. To paraphrase your question, "What gives THEM the right to decide what is offensive to an aboriginal person ... or any other group of people?"

Posted by: Alicia Jul 6 2018, 04:41 PM
Hi Bill, my question was to all who were commenting on the original article. Thank you for answering the question.

Posted by: Bear Jul 6 2018, 07:23 PM
Your final comment, "You're white and you're entitled". is the lowest form of sarcasm and contributes nothing to this debate.

"It's accurate though Charles. As I pointed out earlier, what is it about this issue that gives YOU the right to decide what is offensive to an aboriginal person ?"

Have you lost your mind Bill, or are you just 'doing your job' as 'devil's advocate'? - you certainly seem to enjoy provoking members with your derogatory posts, what do you get out of it?? http://fairdinkumnewschat.com/rolleyes.gif

It is not automatically 'accurate' just because of what YOU have perceived as being 'accurate' in your twisted mind - what gives YOU the right to decide what is offensive to others - this is typical behaviour that we have come to expect from the extremists on the left, sadly many of your posts now days are not worthy of a response, but out of decency members put up with you, this shows their resilience in the face of the devil's advocate.

Your post is just as offensive, time to take a look at yourself Bill - but then, I doubt that you will stop being offensive you enjoy it too much.
http://fairdinkumnewschat.com/wink.gif

Posted by: charka Jul 6 2018, 08:15 PM
Miss Banjo

Posted by: Bear Jul 7 2018, 08:35 AM
"Banjo was a smart man"

For someone who claims to defend certain groups while putting down the white race, you appear to not be as knowledgeable as you led us to believe Bill. http://fairdinkumnewschat.com/wink.gif

Avoidance of naming the dead - a lesson our good friend Sir GS pointed out to us so eloquently.


Quote:

"Thank you so much Sir Flin, Uncle would now have a huge smile on his face, its a high honor in our culture to be called uncle he surely deserves it. I hope everyone else on this forum is ok with it. Sir Charks you have every right to call him brother, I hope I have not offended you. Thank you again Sir Flin." http://fairdinkumnewschat.com/biggrin.gif http://fairdinkumnewschat.com/biggrin.gif http://fairdinkumnewschat.com/biggrin.gif

You may like to edit your post out of respect.

Charles has every right to be offended by your disrespectful post Bill.


"That in itself I find offensive. To paraphrase your question," "What gives THEM the right to decide what is offensive to an aboriginal person ... or any other group of people?"

I enjoyed your story Charles where you have talked about your connection with the Aboriginal people over a number of years, from a young age, I most certainly do not see you, or any other member, as being superior because of their colour, in Bill's words "You're white and you're entitled".

I admire the respect and tolerance shown by the majority of members on this site, you should be commended for this in the face of such comments directed at you.

A rep up for your post Charles, thank you for sharing this story mate.


I am sure that many would share that view Flin, the fact that you acknowledged it speaks for itself, well said Flin. http://fairdinkumnewschat.com/wink.gif


Posted by: charka Jul 7 2018, 10:50 AM
White privlige label offends me Where is my share of the 30billion wasted cash

'
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