Latest Shouts In The Shoutbox -- View The Shoutbox · Rules Collapse  



  Replying to "Dump NAPLAN" - NSW Govt.
Unregistered User Info
Enter your Name
Human Verification Check
If you do not see the checkbox, please contact a board administrator.
Code Buttons
 Guided Mode
 Normal Mode
  Close all Tags

Open Tags:   
Enter your Post
Clickable Smilies
smilie  smilie  smilie  smilie  smilie 
smilie  smilie  smilie  smilie  smilie 
smilie  smilie  smilie  smilie  smilie 
smilie  smilie  smilie  smilie  smilie 
smilie  smilie       
Show All

Post Options  Enable emoticons?
 Enable signature?
Post Icons                                 
                                
  [ Use None ]
 



Last 10 Posts [ In reverse order ]
Charles Posted on May 4 2018, 03:14 PM
 
Nothing muddled about your opinion Alicia. When it comes to teaching and education we are in full agreement.
Alicia Posted on May 4 2018, 12:22 PM
 
I agree with your comments Charles, I should have indicated that I was in part referring to the bit about children not going to weekend sports and parents paying for tutoring. The NAPLAN test may have been testing for schools in need of more funding etc., but it appears to have become a bogeyman for schools and teachers. If a school was after more funding, surely they would be better off to have bad results. I get that private and autonomous schools need good results to attract the pupils and good teachers that they want. I can’t see why parents and kids turn themselves inside out to get good NAPLAN results. From my perspective, a monthly “test” of what your class has gained from your teaching and to show what needs to be revisited by either your class as a whole, or individually for those who need more teaching, is very productive for the pupils’ learning and for parents to see how their child is going. Surely an education system which is doing it’s job properly is very aware of where the education funds should spent. If not, why not? That may be somewhat simplistic but I would think more to the point than NAPLAN testing. In my muddled opinion, that is.
Charles Posted on May 4 2018, 11:08 AM
 
QUOTE (Alicia @ May 4 2018, 09:38 AM)
I understood that NAPLAN was testing the results of the teaching at each school and checking that the teachers were doing their job properly. Not really testing the children personally, I can’t understand why parents and students allowed the schools and teachers to put the onus on them. It is the teachers, the schools and the system under review, not the kids. Have I got that correct Charles?


One of the original intentions was to identify schools in need of funding but, as we both know, the quality of education isn't based on dollars alone.

There are so many variables in education and teaching, that test results don't paint a full picture. It would be wrong to assume that 'poor' results boil down to poor teaching. The socio-economic background of the student body can have a huge influence on results.

Teachers, when seeking appointments, generally prioritise schools in 'good' areas where the students come from middle-upper class homes rather than 'problem areas. With schools given greater autonomy in staff appointments, it is only natural that they target the best teachers.

Fortunately there are some really dedicated teachers that enjoy the challenge of teaching in schools where academic levels are low, behavioural problems exist and parental support is often minimal. Having taught in such schools I know that 'teacher burn-out' is frequent.

Getting back to the tests and test results, there are far too many instances of schools in the private sector using them as an advertising mechanism. 'Good' results attract clientele and the fees that are attached.

Schools have become so concerned about achieving 'good' results that they are directing their teaching in a narrow direction. I have heard anecdotal evidence of how these results are often flawed. Some teachers have been disciplined for prompting during testing while there have been examples of under-achieving students being encouraged to take a day off when tests are conducted.

The pressure on teachers and students to achieve is enormous and is, in my opinion, detrimental to the whole education process.
http://fairdinkumnewschat.b1.jcink.com/uploads/fairdinkumnewschat/soapbox_888.gif
charka Posted on May 4 2018, 09:49 AM
 
Well not to much has worked Especially when diversity gender fluidity safe school what do you expect Every thing except teaching Global warming hoax it goes on
Alicia Posted on May 4 2018, 09:38 AM
 
I understood that NAPLAN was testing the results of the teaching at each school and checking that the teachers were doing their job properly. Not really testing the children personally, I can’t understand why parents and students allowed the schools and teachers to put the onus on them. It is the teachers, the schools and the system under review, not the kids. Have I got that correct Charles?
Charles Posted on May 4 2018, 09:09 AM
 
NAPLAN testing needs to be dumped in NSW with 'haste', NSW Government says

user posted image

Photo: Education Minster Rob Stokes says the test has become a way to "extort money" from students.

New South Wales is the first state to call for NAPLAN testing to be scrapped, with Education Minister Rob Stokes demanding it be replaced as a matter of urgency.

The test is being used dishonestly as a school rating system, Mr Stokes said, and has sprouted an industry that extorts money from desperate families.

Mr Stokes said the assessment, for students in years 3, 5, 7 and 9, is being used to rate students, not track their progress.

"You now have an industry that's grown up alongside it, where teachers are being encouraged to teach to the test rather than the curriculum," he said.

"It's become a vehicle for edu-businesses to extort money out of desperate students and their family.

"When you now have private schools marketing their NAPLAN success, that points to the failure of NAPLAN, and it's time we had discussions about replacing it."

Mr Stokes said the test had been "used and abused" and was not useful as it did not take into account any differences between different schools and communities.

He is expected to call on the Federal Government at a meeting of education minsters today to replace the test "in haste" with a less high stakes assessment as recommended by the Gonski report.

This would involve smaller, regular and more flexible testing based on the curriculum to assess a child's progress.

Mr Stokes said that if NAPLAN was not tied to federal funding, New South Wales would pull out of the test.

Labor's education spokesman Jihad Dib, former principal of Punchbowl Boys School, is in support of Mr Stokes' call and said the test had put enormous pressure on families.

"Because of the high stakes nature of it, the tutoring industry has absolutely exploded," he said.

"I know stories where parents are working two or three jobs just to pay for their kids to get tutoring.

"And kids as young as nine are not getting put into weekend sports just so they can go to cram schools or tutoring centres."

Mr Dib said NAPLAN narrowed the curriculum and "gets away from the purpose of education".


http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-05-04/demands-for-naplan-to-be-dumped-in-nsw/9725934

The dangers of NAPLAN has been something I have spoken on a number of occasions. It is refreshing to have an Education Minister recognising the obvious flaws.

I have highlighted some of the major points, rather than repeat myself and what is written in the article.

However, there is one sentence that rings alarm bells, "Mr Stokes said that if NAPLAN was not tied to federal funding, New South Wales would pull out of the test." This clearly indicates that states are being held to ransom by their federal counterpart. This started with Julia Gillard's push to centralise control of education and is something that should have been abolished long ago.